wound


wound
wound n Wound, trauma, traumatism, lesion, bruise, contusion are comparable when they mean an injury to one of the organs or parts of the body.
Wound generally denotes an injury that is inflicted by a hard or sharp instrument (as a knife, a bullet, or a club)
forcibly driven or applied, and is characterized by breaking of the skin or mucous membrane and usually by damage to the tissues beneath
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deep wounds made by a bayonet

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a bite wound is likely to become infected

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In extended use wound can apply to a figurative hurt or blow (as to the mind or to society)
inflicts wounds upon the human spirit which no surgery can heal— Woolf
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the perfect way to heal many of the world's worst woundsMazur

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Trauma basically applies to a wound or other injury (as a strain, fracture, or concussion) resulting from external force or violence (as from a fall, a blow, a shot, a stab, or a burn) or from a cause incidental to birth or surgery. Often the term is extended to a mental or emotional blow or stress that results in disordered feelings or behavior or leaves a lasting abnormal impression on the mind
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hysteria is a condition that often results from a psychic trauma

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great social traumas like the French Revolution and the American Civil War— Heard

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what psychologists call a trauma, a shock whose increasing aftereffects . . . testified to the susceptibility of the saint to sin— Thomas Mann

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In this connection trauma tends to pass in meaning from the injury received to the effect it produces
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the disillusion of the older generation had become the spiritual trauma of the younger— Aldridge

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a postwar boom that got us over the physical trauma of the 1930's— Galantière

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Traumatism in general use is seldom clearly distinguished from trauma
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the traumatisms of history with time . . . become embedded in the culture of a people— Edmond Taylor

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but in technical use it tends to be applied specifically to the local or general disordered state that results from injury or wounding
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fractures, sprains . . . burns and similar traumatisms— JAMA

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Lesion basically implies an injury or impairment
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the severe control... is no lesion to inward harmony and happiness— Muirhead

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but in medical use it applies spe-cifically to a usually clearly circumscribed pathological change in tissue that may be caused by a wound or injury or be symptomatic of a disease or degenerative process
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tuberculous lesions in the lung

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syphilitic lesions

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a traumatic lesion

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In much of its general use lesion is an extension of the medical sense and implies a damaged or defective point or a weak spot
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a comic example of the lesions in Shakespeare studies— Margery Bailey

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crime has . . . become the symptom of a radical lesion in the stamina of humanity— Zabel

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Bruise is the general and contusion the more technical term for an injury, ordinarily due to impact, that results in more or less disorganization of tissues beneath the skin without breaking it but with black and blue discoloration due to oozing of blood into the tissues
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his letter talks of a disjointed thumb, a contusion on the hip, and a sightless eyeLucas

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Only bruise has appreciable extended use and in this it tends to be strictly metaphoric
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the social and economic bruises that have come from our violence to nature— Sears

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all sensitiveness, at bottom is an intimation of pain and of fear ... a shrinking from the bruise, and an awareness of transitoriness— Behrman

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Analogous words: *injury, hurt: burning or burn (see BURN)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:
, (for example, a cut, stab, bruise, etc.), , , , (with some weapon or such agency) / , , , , , , , , , / (of the mind or feelings), , , , , , , , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wound — Wound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wounding}.] [AS. wundian. [root]140. See {Wound}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — wound1 [wo͞ond] n. [ME wunde < OE wund, akin to Ger wunde < IE * wen , var. of base * wā , to hit, wound > WEN1] 1. an injury to the body in which the skin or other tissue is broken, cut, pierced, torn, etc. 2. an injury to a plant… …   English World dictionary

  • Wound — (?; 277), n. [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — [n] injury anguish, bruise, cut, damage, distress, gash, grief, harm, heartbreak, hurt, insult, laceration, lesion, pain, pang, shock, slash, torment, torture, trauma; concept 309 wound [v1] cause bodily damage bruise, carve, clip*, contuse, cut …   New thesaurus

  • wound´ed|ly — wound|ed «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|ed — «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded, those who …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound´i ly — wound|y «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|y — «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wound — Wound, imp. & p. p. of {Wind} to twist, and {Wind} to sound by blowing. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound up — [ˌwaund ˈʌp] adj [not before noun] anxious, worried, or excited ▪ I was too wound up to sleep …   Dictionary of contemporary English